Reviewed by: Greg Mueller

Greg's Score:
8.88

Plot/Story

8

Characters

9

Acting

10

Cinematography

10

Production Design

9

Soundtrack

9

Execution

8

Emotional Impact

8


Review:

To get it out of the way, I have never seen the original Suspiria, so I have no comparison to make. I also never watched any trailers and really had only seen Dakota Johnson in the costume she wears at the big performance. Word of mouth is the only reason I even knew this film existed. That said, I loved Suspiria, but I fell that they under-explain considering how weird and confusing this movie is. As I seem to say every time, I'm trying not to spoil any plot details, not that I could spoil much, because I feel like I'm not understanding at least a quarter of it. What I do want to talk about it everything else. Suspiria is usually a very dull, drab movie that still has brilliant scenes that look beautiful and feel colorful and loud even though they often aren't. The score and soundtrack are haunting and are used in interesting ways. The acting is almost perfect from the entire cast. Although I don't care for or understand "modern dance" the dedication of the cast to master all the choreography is astounding. The way the shots are framed, you see all the other dancers and even though their stuff isn't as intense as Johnson's the still look great. The one issue I have is with one of Tilda Swinton's characters. One of the three characters she plays is an old man and although her acting is spot on, the voice is clearly a woman's voice. The accent and emotions are all great, but they really needed to adjust the sound of her voice. Also, the make up and prosthesis look good, but it doesn't always move correctly when she talks; when you see her face head-on, it's very noticeable that it doesn't move right with her mouth. The best part is the cinematography, which manages to feel old and novel at the same time. There are the ridiculous 60's/70's horror zoom-in shots that are hokey, but somehow feel right at home within the same scene as beautifully done editing and newer techniques. I don't know if it's color-grading or what, but there are a lot of scenes that look like an old movie that are succeeded by clear, crisp current shots. Suspiria feels real and often confusingly emotional, but is interspersed with over the top scenes that should stick out, by somehow it all feels cohesive. My only big issue is that I wanted more information and explanation. Again, I have never seen the original, so I had to road map to follow and Suspiria would really benefit from a little more exposition from someone other than Swinton's male character. As others have said, Suspiria is definitely not for everyone and I'd go as far as to say that it's not for most people. It is certainly a horror movie, but it's much more like the horror movies that general audiences seem to hate (The VVitch or Hereditary) than The Nun or Halloween.